Immigrant Stories: How did you come to US?

Celebrating the Immigrant in all of US--even you, yes you

digitaldesperados:

These photos are from the archives of the Indian Express 2013 and capture moments from when women who are widows were allowed to join the Holi celebrations. 

They say “ Breaking the shackles of tradition, around 800 widows played Holi with gulal and flowers in the land of Lord Krishna, Vrindavan in four-day Holi celebrations that began on March 24. 

Vrindavan Holi is an effort to free widows from the shackles of age-old tradition. Not only will the widows play Holi, they will also participate in cultural programmes.

The widows feel such celebrations would prove to be an unprecedented step towards ending social prejudice against them. The event this year may need some amount of change in the mindset of the society.

However, the ‘breaking’ of traditions by widows in Vrindavan has drawn criticism from a section of religious leaders who believe that it is an ‘infringement of our ancient culture’.

In the past, widows living in the ashrams could have played Holi only with Thakurji (Lord Krishna).

A veteran in the popular Ram Lila act, Shankar Lal Chaturvedi criticised the event, saying, ‘The manner in which they smeared face of each other with gulal is not good.’ ”

The photos show the women (who are widows) praying, tossing flowers and generally celebrating Holi at at the Meera Sahavagini ashram in Vrindavan.



(via vincecarters)

whitecolonialism:

Emancipation Inclusion and Exclusion: A Look Into Slavery in Brazil.

Brazil was the last nation on the Western Hemisphere to outlaw slavery, by the time slavery had been abolished in 1888, an estimated four million African slaves had been imported into Brazil, making up 40% of the total number of slaves brought into the Americas. The images above display the faces of the driving force behind Brazils economy for centuries. 

After outlawing slavery in 1888 Brazil initiated a national campaign known as branquemento, translated into English as “whitening,” with the purpose of whitening the face of Brazil. Brazil attempted to accomplish this by inviting white immigrants into the nation as well as encouraging Blacks to marry whites. Through inter-marriage the Brazilian elite was hopeful that the Brazilian population would acquire lighter skin. 

Despite Brazils numerous attempts to make the nation appear whiter and less Black, today 50.7% of the Brazilian population or 97 million Brazilians identify with their African ancestry for the first time in it’s history since records began.

"People are no longer scared of identifying themselves or insecure about saying: ‘I’m black, and black is beautiful.’"

- Elio Ferreira de Araujo, Brazil’s minister for racial equality, describes why there is a rise in the number of Brazilians who identify as Black.

vicemag:

Denmark’s Controversial Teenage Muslim Superstar Poet
Yahya Hassan is an 18-year-old Muslim Palestinian immigrant to Denmark who has become a social critic, celebrity writer, and general shit-stirrer—all thanks to a slim volume of poetry. Since the release of his self-titled debut collection in October, he’s been all over the Danish media, at least in part due to his subject matter. His poetry, written in all caps in Danish, is full of rage directed at his parents’ generation, a group of Muslims he accuses of hypocrisy and abandoning their children. He’s penned lines like:
YOU YOU’RE A MUSLIM? / YOU YOU DON’T KNOW/ IF YOU WANT HALAL OR HARAM / YOU YOU KNOW YOU WANT HARAM / BUT YOU YOU PRETEND YOU WANT HALAL / YOU YOU DON’T WANT PIG / MAY ALLAH REWARD YOU FOR YOUR FOOD HABITS.
Some of his poetry documents an abusive childhood; Yahya grew up in a poor neighborhood of Aarhus, and flirted with crime from an early age. He blames much of that on his mother and father. “As soon as our parents landed in Copenhagen airport it felt as if their role as parents was coming to an end,” Yahya told the Danish newspaper Politiken in the interview, published on October 5, that turned him into a teenage social commentator.
Continue

vicemag:

Denmark’s Controversial Teenage Muslim Superstar Poet

Yahya Hassan is an 18-year-old Muslim Palestinian immigrant to Denmark who has become a social critic, celebrity writer, and general shit-stirrer—all thanks to a slim volume of poetry. Since the release of his self-titled debut collection in October, he’s been all over the Danish media, at least in part due to his subject matter. His poetry, written in all caps in Danish, is full of rage directed at his parents’ generation, a group of Muslims he accuses of hypocrisy and abandoning their children. He’s penned lines like:

YOU YOU’RE A MUSLIM? / YOU YOU DON’T KNOW/ IF YOU WANT HALAL OR HARAM / YOU YOU KNOW YOU WANT HARAM / BUT YOU YOU PRETEND YOU WANT HALAL / YOU YOU DON’T WANT PIG / MAY ALLAH REWARD YOU FOR YOUR FOOD HABITS.

Some of his poetry documents an abusive childhood; Yahya grew up in a poor neighborhood of Aarhus, and flirted with crime from an early age. He blames much of that on his mother and father. “As soon as our parents landed in Copenhagen airport it felt as if their role as parents was coming to an end,” Yahya told the Danish newspaper Politiken in the interview, published on October 5, that turned him into a teenage social commentator.

Continue

(via muslimrave)

guatepolitics:

Selections from a photo series by Fred Ramos that won World Press Photo in 2014.

Despite the massive and continuing rise of disappeared people, and reappearing bodies, the Mexican state still does not have a DNA database that would allow family members seeking loved ones to find them. Raymundo Sánchez, of the Institute of Legal Medicine, has begun saving the personal details, especially clothing, of the re-appeared in the hopes that they can be recognized and claimed by loved ones.

(Source: elfaro.net, via mamitah)

larespuestamedia:

We attended Centro’s event for their new book on Tato Laviera last night.

larespuestamedia:

We attended Centro’s event for their new book on Tato Laviera last night.

garraberlin:

The Founding Father of the Tropical Diaspora Roots Sound with the very afro-latin undeground party inna Berlin city, Dj GArRinchA strictly vinyl with a focus on quality music - rare brazilian afro and latinamerica grooves.

…to point out not only the importance and meaning of this statement in the early 1960s but also its effect today for the tropical diaspora…

“I want to play music that is meaningful, that stands the test of time,”. “It’s no longer commercial; it’s deep African music, serious music,….” - FELA KUTI

GRAND OPENING WITH LIVE ACTS, DJS, WM PUBLIC VIEWING and FESTA JUNINA THE WHOLE DAY!

insidethediasporawithfatima:

Hope you and the family enjoyed your #Birthday Ms. @oluchi1 Thanks for all you are doing. #Oluchi #Diaspora #AfricasNextTopModel @antmafrica #InsideTheDiasporaWithFatima #Nigeria

insidethediasporawithfatima:

Hope you and the family enjoyed your #Birthday Ms. @oluchi1 Thanks for all you are doing. #Oluchi #Diaspora #AfricasNextTopModel @antmafrica #InsideTheDiasporaWithFatima #Nigeria

nhaofnewnu:

"we are the children of fearless visionaries,
of revolutionary refugees who escaped the motherland,
packing only the resilience burning within their hearts,
the mindset that carried them on,
the tradition that they can now pass down to us.”

Strangers in a Foreign Land: Nationalism and the Orthodox Church

onbehalfofall:

Strangers in a Foreign Land: Nationalism and the Orthodox Church

Strangers in a Foreign Land: Nationalism and the Orthodox Church

In calling the Church ‘catholic,’ Orthodox Christians confess belief in a Church that is for all ages, nations, and races.

The Catholic Church is whole, complete, and lacking nothing—for this is what ‘catholic’ truly means. It is a calling for all, and Christ our God is sacrificed ‘on behalf of all, and for all.’

There is often confusion—especially for those either outside or unfamiliar with the…

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kiongozi:

Pan-African History: Political Figures from Africa and the Diaspora since 1787 by Hakim Adi (.pdf version) (full book)

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Pan-African History brings together Pan-Africanist thinkers and activists from the Anglophone and Francophone worlds of the past two-hundred years. Included are well-known figures such as Malcolm X, W.E.B. Du Bois, Kwame Nkrumah, and Martin Delany, and the authors’ original research on lesser-known figures such as Constance Cummings-John and Dusé Mohammed Ali reveals exciting new aspects of Pan-African activism.

(Source: magnolome)

ijustglow:

Dr. Ishakamusa Barashango - Portraits of an Eternal People

Changing an African woman narrative…victim to bold

meraki-meraki:

I’m interested in how working to change a narrative from one of trauma and victim hood to one of empowerment and boldness even in the face of stark vulnerability can transform a life positively. I am particularly focused on how speaking the truth of our individual and collective experiences as women of the diaspora can free women to live up to their potential.  The African diaspora is comprised of many different women from different countries, cultures and beliefs. Some have come from war ridden countries and have experienced first hand the loss of humanity that brings, some have gone through some abandonment and trauma within families. I am more aware of issues that still plague people like FGM, domestic violence and rape. What happens to those things when they move to a different country? Are they allowed to speak of it or experience difficulties associated with past traumas in an empowering and safe space? I am aware that for a long time the narrative for African women and black women has been we are strong and it is a shameful thing to show that you are human after all. I come from a long line of strong females who you never heard a whimper from, all they showed was boldness and a can do attitude. I celebrate that. However that meant that there is a veil of silence for those women who find themselves unable to show that strength all of the time. Women who are beautiful but flawed. Strong but vulnerable. They suffer in silence.  Some of them die in silence. It took a long time to see that it is strength to speak your truth without flinching. It took a long time to admit that I have bones to gather despite looking like I have it all together. I am using this space to explore the often hidden life of an African woman in the diaspora and the disconnect that can take place. I am that woman and you may be that woman. All I know is progress happens when we speak the truth and find solutions for freedom. I am both strong and vulnerable.

                                                            Live.Love.Africa


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What is it to leave a place? What is it to question your own memory of that place? What is it to have this innate connection to a place in which you don’t live at anymore? How can you keep generating a collective and cultural memory which you know you’re very much implicated in and very much spiritually connected to but meanwhile, the connections are very frayed… but meanwhile, they are overwhelmingly strong. The poem for me becomes a way to give contour to all these provisional, competing, difficult, contestatory, generous, poignant, ridiculous notions of home, war, how do you tell a story?

—Myung Mi Kim, in Between the Lines: Asian American Women’s Poetry (2001)

(Source: bloomroot)