Immigrant Stories: How did you come to US?

Celebrating the Immigrant in all of US--even you, yes you

trotskay:

went to an American restaurant today!!!! ‘ello mate!!!!!! put forks in my hair to show my love for these Westerners’ food!!! Haha!!!!! Ha!!!! Ha!!! Ha!!! Ha  !

(Source: frantzofanon, via afternoonsnoozebutton)

dynamicafrica:

Here’s how the world’s best would stack up in a World Cup with no first-generation immigrants.

With the current anti-immigrant sentiment sweeping many parts of the Western world gaining more and more traction, Global Post has taken on the conservative approach to this issue and applied strict immigration policies to the teams of the 2014 World Cup.

Global Post compiled the list by selecting only the group favorites and the “big losers.” Not all players are represented as they focused solely on those who are the most integral in their respective teams.

From their list, we’ve selected a few teams that represent the most black players, players of African descent and those whose background is related to Africa or the diaspora in some way.

ITALY:
Italy loses  Fiorentina forward Giuseppe Rossi was born in New Jersey and AC Milan striker Mario Balotelli, born in Palermo, has parents who immigrated from Ghana.

FRANCE:
France can hardly field a team without its immigrants. It drops Bacary Sagna and Mamadou Sakho, whose parents were born in Senegal, and Patrice Evra, who was born there. It also loses Blaise Matuidi, whose father was born in Angola; Eliaquim Mangala, whose parents were born in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rio Mavuba, whose father was born in Zaire and mother in Angola, Moussa Sissoko, whose parents were born in Mali; and Marseille midfielder Matthieu Valbuena, whose father was born in Spain. And don’t look for as much flash without Karim Benzema, whose father was born in Algeria. France also loses Paul Pogba, whose parents were born in Guinea.

GHANA:
Ghana keeps Kevin-Prince Boateng and gets back Jerome Boateng from Germany — their father was born in Ghana, though the brothers were born in Berlin. The same goes for  Jordan Ayew, whose parents were born in Ghana though he was born in France. As a final bonus, Ghana picks up AC Milan striker Mario Balotelli, whose biological parents were born in Ghana, from Italy. It also gets Danny Welbeck, whose parents were born in Ghana, from England.

GERMANY:
Germany lose superstar Arsenal midfielder Mesut Ozil, whose father was born in Turkey; Real Madrid midfielder Sami Khedira, whose father was born in Tunisia; and Lazio striker Miroslav Klose, who was born in Poland. They’ll also take the field without Bayern Munich defender Jerome Boateng, who has roots in Ghana; Sampdori defender Shkodran Mustafi, whose parents are Albanians born in Macedonia; and Lukas Podolski, who was born in Poland.

PORTUGAL:
Portugal loses Real Madrid defender Kepler Laveran Lima Ferreira, aka Pepe, to his native Brazil. It loses Fenerbahce S.K. Defender Bruno Alves, whose father was born in Brazil. It also drops Luis Carlos Almeida da Cunha, aka Nani, who was born in Cape Verde (independent from Portugal since 1975), and FC Porto winger Silvestre Varela, whose parents were born there. Lucky for them, Real Madrid striker Cristiano Ronaldo, whose great grandmother was from Cape Verde, isn’t an immigrant by our rules.

USA:
Tthe melting-pot nation loses Sunderland striker Jozy Altidore, whose parents were born in Haiti; Tim Howard, whose mother is Hungarian; AZ striker Aron Johannsson, who was born to Icelandic parents in Alabama; and Rosenborg midfielder Mix Diskerud, who was born in Norway. We’ll also take away LA Galaxy defender Omar Gonzalez, whose parents were born in Mexico, and Nantes midfielder Alejandro Bedoya, whose father was born in Colombia.

BELGIUM:
The fathers of both Manchester City defender Vincent Kompany and Everton striker Romelu Lukaku were born in what is today the Democratic Republic of Congo. Everton striker Kevin Mirallas’ father was born in Spain. Marouane Fellaini’s parents were born in Morocco. FC Zenit Saint Petersburgmidfielder Axel Witsel’s father is from France. And Tottenham Hotspur midfielder Mousa Dembele’s father was born in Mali.

(edited from source)

H/T katebomz

weareallmixedup:

Slur tw

(I’m sorry I’m submitting this on anonymous I just don’t feel comfortable giving out these details of my family history and experiences with my url attached).

For the purposes of this discussion I have lived in West Africa and Europe, and I’m mixed (yes that is how I identify) with African and Afro-Latinx. I identify as an ethnically mixed mono-racial black person.

I, like the Filipino/Indian submission I am feeling incredibly angry and hurt at the things Jay has said. Growing up I know for my sibling especially they has light skin, black, blonde and red hair, they sticks out like a sore thumb when they’re with our family, their identity issues are valid, their experiences are valid and their identity as a mixed person is valid, and I won’t let anyone invalidate that ever. They has also been bullied by people including our close family members for the shape of her eyes (which I guess can be attributed to some distant native ancestry we have) and gets called ch*nk constantly. For me and my other siblings it was the opposite we have dark skin and kinky hair, whenever we talk about our afro-latinx side people actually laugh in our faces and tell us there is no way dark people like us are good enough to be latinx. I used to be too scared to talk about that side of my heritage because I was sick of people arguing with me about where I am from, or telling me that I’m just black and I am just trying to be special (despite the fact that I have never disputed being black on both sides). The prejudice within my family is immense too and we have effectively been exorcised and disowned because we’re not good enough for our afro-latinx relatives. This is the reality of our lives you are belittling and it is incredibly hurtful.

Personally for me I am also in a relationship with a black person of another ethnicity (they are mixed ethnicty as well), and between us we have three cultures and six languages to pass down to our children. We are constantly talking about how to deal with these issues and how to balance our ties to our heritages so we can help any children we have form an identity, If our kids wanted to identify as mixed would you deny them too? My African’s family discrimination towards my partner is huge and it is solely on the basis of his ethnicity, they do not care that we are both black! My family have threatened me because of our relationship and tried to force me to end our relationship.

Having said all this I am also aware that multiracial people face unique issues that I as a monoracial person (even though I am multiethnic) can’t quite fully understand. Our struggles overlap and I feel a sense of solidarity with multiracial people but they are not exactly the same. I also recognize that multiracial people face unique issues and that’s why blogs like this are so important. I have been quietly following this blog for a long time, because I identify with the experiences (not all as I am not multiracial but a lot of them). Now I’m not sure what to do, I feel like I should unfollow because you guys don’t even recognise my identity as valid but I feel attached to this blog also. I

——————————

We don’t want you to unfollow. We’re still talking about how to reconcile the whole matter. We never said monoracial multiethnic POC don’t face discrimination or identity issues. But this blog is primarily for multiracial people. Maybe it’ll change but currently we are not equipped for monoracial multiethnic persons. It’d be unfair to everyone if we suddenly changed our focus. Throughout this entire discussion no one has ever said that monoracial multiethnic POC could start their own blog. We’ve historically allowed people such as transracial adoptees to interact with us because they haven’t had their own space and like monoracial multiethnic persons, we have a lot in common. But we all have out own areas that are unique or more difficult or more common for each of us. We all need people and spaces with people who understand that for personal experience. There are many issues to discuss for this topic. The usage of the word mixed to mean mixed race is definitely US centric. I’ll have to get used to the fact that people outside the US and/or people who are X generation immigrants use the term differently. I’m sorry that I spoke out of complete ignorance but going forward I’ll say “mixed race” because honestly, as you can tell, I know little to nothing about social issues, especially ethnic issues outside the US. To be frank, You may feel a sense of a solidarity with multiracial people but I still don’t know if I can let my guard down, especially when monoracial multiethnic people are coming here and basically demanding that we accept them without argument or discussion. I have one black parent and one white parent. They are complete opposites in the racial hierarchy in every way in the entire world and somehow I exist. I’m not saying my feelings are right but isn’t it possible neither of us are wrong? Despite my personal feelings, I’ll continue to be open to hearing people out, especially those who aren’t tied to the US. But please do not keep insisting that multiracial people need to accept everything monoracial multiethnic persons say without question. — Jay (Ps when saying monoracial multiethnic, I mean POC. White people, this discussion isn’t about or for you.)

In Germany, migrants from ‘Muslim countries’ applying for nationality are required to pass a discriminatory ‘Muslim Test’ which asks questions such as: What would you do if your son was gay? In the Netherlands, applicants are asked to react to a video showing two men kissing…it is not incidental that the attention drawn to non-Western and Muslim gender and sexual regimes comes at the same time as the ‘War on Terror’, the increase in restrictive migration policies and the general upsurge in Islamophobia…‘gay rights’ and gender equality, even though they were achieved very recently and not at all exhaustively, have become symbols of the civilization and modernity of Western countries. While the importance of these (even if limited) rights and equality is not disputed, the authors warn against a white Western single-issue emancipatory politics that claims universality and patronizes non-white non-Western Muslim women and queers, while serving neo-imperialistic, racist discourses. It seems rather obvious to draw a parallel with how Western feminist abolitionists feed into security laws that criminalize migrant sex workers and effectively lead to deportation and further marginalisation in the name of combating gender violence. The same societies that demonize and discriminate against Muslims are increasingly criminalizing sex workers, using ideas about both homophobia and gender violence as their tools to deport and detain migrants, sex workers and people of colour.

When she thinks to herself in her father’s language, she knows sons and daughters don’t leave their parents’ house until they marry. When she thinks in English, she knows she should’ve been on her own since eighteen.

— Sandra Cisneros (The House on Mango Street)

(Source: yesixicana, via morenamala)

Settler colonial power and anti-Black racism/slavery structure the social order in the US and North America. As an ongoing form of domination, settler colonialism requires the genocide of Native people in order for the Settler to accumulate Native people’s land and turn the land into property. Settler colonial relations are maintained through various forms of repressive and discursive power. For example, the physical extermination of Native people is accompanied by the cultural genocide of Native peoples. Not just Native peoples, but their entire worldview must be erased from the face of the earth. One of the discursive forms of genocide and colonization in settler colonial states is the imposition and institutionalization of Western gender, heteropatriarchy and the notion of the individual or Enlightenment’s human. The imposition of a Western gender order and its attendant racialized sexuality ushered in sexual violence as a tool of settler colonialism. In the Clearing examines the spaces where both settler colonialism and slavery/anti-Black racism shape the landscape.

—Tiffany King, “In The Clearing: Black Female Bodies, Space, and Settler Colonialism,” p. 3-4 (via afrometaphysics)

(Source: so-treu, via hummussexual)

What is it to leave a place? What is it to question your own memory of that place? What is it to have this innate connection to a place in which you don’t live at anymore? How can you keep generating a collective and cultural memory which you know you’re very much implicated in and very much spiritually connected to but meanwhile, the connections are very frayed… but meanwhile, they are overwhelmingly strong? The poem for me becomes a way to give contour to all these provisional, competing, difficult, contestatory, generous, poignant, ridiculous notions of home, war, how do you tell a story.

—Myung Mi Kim, in Between the Lines: Asian American Women’s Poetry (2001)

(Source: bloomroot)

asianamericanactivism:

"Asian Women as Leaders" in Roots: An Asian American Reader (UCLA Asian American Studies Center, 1971). Reprinted from Rodan (Northern California Asian American Community News, April 1971).
Page 2 (not printed in Roots, text found in Asian Women journal [Berkeley, 1971]):

-tions, they find that their ideas are usurped by the men, who then take credit for the idea as being their own. Women are often heard but not listened to. Many times the women must play her old role in order to get things done: “Oh, please, can you help me carry this. It’s much too heavy for little old me…”
How can these problems be solved: People must recognize that women are half of the working force in the movement against oppression, exploitation, and imperialism. They are half of the working force in creating the new revolutionary lifestyle. Men and women in the movement must therefore begin to live the ideals and goals they are working for. To do this, they must not let chauvinist acts slide by. People cannot work together effectively if there are hidden tensions or if people let little annoyances build up inside themselves. They must deal with sexism on the same basis as they would deal with racism and imperialism. They must be able to develop as human beings, not subject to categorizations and stereotypes. Developing as people confident in themselves, in their ideas, they will not be afraid of criticism; they will see the need for criticism, self-criticism in order to move forward. The struggle is not men against women or women against men, but it is a united front striving for a new society, a new way of life.
If I go forward,
Follow me.
Push me if I fall behind.
If I betray you,
Kill me.
If they take me,
Avenge me then in kind.

asianamericanactivism:

"Asian Women as Leaders" in Roots: An Asian American Reader (UCLA Asian American Studies Center, 1971). Reprinted from Rodan (Northern California Asian American Community News, April 1971).

Page 2 (not printed in Roots, text found in Asian Women journal [Berkeley, 1971]):

-tions, they find that their ideas are usurped by the men, who then take credit for the idea as being their own. Women are often heard but not listened to. Many times the women must play her old role in order to get things done: “Oh, please, can you help me carry this. It’s much too heavy for little old me…”

How can these problems be solved: People must recognize that women are half of the working force in the movement against oppression, exploitation, and imperialism. They are half of the working force in creating the new revolutionary lifestyle. Men and women in the movement must therefore begin to live the ideals and goals they are working for. To do this, they must not let chauvinist acts slide by. People cannot work together effectively if there are hidden tensions or if people let little annoyances build up inside themselves. They must deal with sexism on the same basis as they would deal with racism and imperialism. They must be able to develop as human beings, not subject to categorizations and stereotypes. Developing as people confident in themselves, in their ideas, they will not be afraid of criticism; they will see the need for criticism, self-criticism in order to move forward. The struggle is not men against women or women against men, but it is a united front striving for a new society, a new way of life.

If I go forward,

Follow me.

Push me if I fall behind.

If I betray you,

Kill me.

If they take me,

Avenge me then in kind.

cultureunseen:

Salute to Sister Soldier Yuri Kochiyama!

Born May 19, 1921 (93 years young and strong)
An extraordinary Japanese American woman who spoke out and fought shoulder-to-shoulder with African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and Whites for social justice, civil rights, and prisoners and women’s rights in the U.S. and internationally for over half a century. A prolific writer and speaker on human rights, Kochiyama has spoken at over 100 colleges and universities and high schools in the U.S. and Canada.

http://www.amazon.com/Heartbeat-Struggle-Revolutionary-Kochiyama-Critical/dp/0816645930

(via huevosenserio)

oparnoshoshoi:

thatwasuzi:

letterstomycountry:

thisisnotjapan:

I was going through some old photographs and belongings of my grandmother’s in storage and I came across this. She saved the newspaper clipping from her internment.
Reading it made me feel so sad and disgusted I wanted to cry. 

LTMC: Jingoistic journalism at its best.

Never forget. This actually happened. In America. The United States.
FDR decided people of a certain heritage didn’t have rights and damn near everyone rolled over and let him do it.
Do not forget this. Do not let it happen again.

Next time someone says “the government would never do that!” or “the American people would never let that happen!” remind them of this.

oparnoshoshoi:

thatwasuzi:

letterstomycountry:

thisisnotjapan:

I was going through some old photographs and belongings of my grandmother’s in storage and I came across this. She saved the newspaper clipping from her internment.

Reading it made me feel so sad and disgusted I wanted to cry. 

LTMC: Jingoistic journalism at its best.

Never forget. This actually happened. In America. The United States.

FDR decided people of a certain heritage didn’t have rights and damn near everyone rolled over and let him do it.

Do not forget this. Do not let it happen again.

Next time someone says “the government would never do that!” or “the American people would never let that happen!” remind them of this.

(via blissfulle)

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

not quite white: a documentary exploring the construction of whiteness in the united states as applied to arab and slavic immigrants drawing upon the filmmaker’s own syrian and polish/slovak heritage.

(Source: , via suumaq)