Immigrant Stories: How did you come to US?

Celebrating the Immigrant in all of US--even you, yes you

The Middle Passage journey from West Africa to the Americas took 4 to 6 months.

Try walking around without wiping your butt for a day or a week. Yep now try laying down in shit for 4-6 weeks, most of it isnt your own. Then add some blood and some mucus. Then grab some chains. Slavery was that bad. dont u ever fucking tell me it wasnt! (via howtobenoladarling)

Not to mention every now and then you were raped by those that were working the ships.  Male and female were raped.

(via theafrosistuh)

24 hrs laying in extremely tight positions with hundreds of people that are suffering from all kinds of diseases due to malnutrition. Weather wasnt always the way the ship owners planned and voyages took longer than usually, the longest I was told by a professor was a whole year. 

(via madonnawhorereject)

Most people have no idea what happened to our ancestors, and that’s due to the fact that the powers that be want to act like it never happened.  

(via paranoidsuperhero)

Reblogging some real shit from my Liked posts. Because fuck you.

(via bludclotartattack)

And let’s add on the fact that ships have to make port and re-supply and between Africa and America lay the Caribbean and South America, which still took a great deal more to travel to. So families were separated not only by death and torment, but by members being sold off on a different continent than where they might have been bound.

Not to mention ships get blown off course, and the slave next to you might have died and you have to sleep next to a corpse for who knows how long before the crew finally decides to handle it and toss it overboard like so much offal.

Sharks still follow the course of the slave trade ships till this day due to the amount of offal and human bodies that were tossed overboard in the ship’s wake.

(via thegoddamazon)

(Damn is that last thing about sharks true?!)

Yes. They threw so many bodies overboard it changed the ecological feeding patterns of sharks. They follow the slave ships from dock to port. They were even used as an act of terrorism to force Africans on to ships and encourage them not to commit suicide. Slave ships were often packed for collateral damage. It was estimated that many would not make the journey and all those bodies thrown overboard were insured. That’s how insurance companies got their start… It’s also how many families built their family fortune.


This was a business.

(via howtobeterrell)

FOREVER reblog.

(via face--the--strange)

somepalestiniankid:

jewishpolitics:

blardenfrazifonochip:

jewishpolitics:

blardenfrazifonochip:

You know, even though I’m anti Israel now, saying that I didn’t have a very good time on Birthright almost three years ago would be lying, and now whenever I see someone on my Facebook newsfeed talk about how they’re going to go, or when they post pictures from their trip, it ‘s painful, because…

Israel is not a colony it is a country. You didn’t help colonialism because Israel is a country and not subject to the rule of any foreign entity. Israel is a legally established nation and has a right to its land.

It’s not colonialism nor is it imperialism. Israel is a great nation full of freedom, innovation, and equal rights.

Yes I did help colonialism because I was benefiting the Israeli economy, which funds the displacement of the Palestinian people on a daily basis.

Israel is a great nation full of freedom, innovation, and equal rights.
Tell that to the Arabs and Ethiopians who reside in Israel.

Would that be the same Arabs and Ethiopian Jews who have equal rights and are Israeli citizens? Or do you mean the Palestinians who live in this so called “Palestine” and the illegal Ethiopians who are causing havoc in Tel Aviv? 

lmaooooooooooooo

What is it to leave a place? What is it to question your own memory of that place? What is it to have this innate connection to a place in which you don’t live at anymore? How can you keep generating a collective and cultural memory which you know you’re very much implicated in and very much spiritually connected to but meanwhile, the connections are very frayed… but meanwhile, they are overwhelmingly strong. The poem for me becomes a way to give contour to all these provisional, competing, difficult, contestatory, generous, poignant, ridiculous notions of home, war, how do you tell a story?

—Myung Mi Kim, in Between the Lines: Asian American Women’s Poetry (2001)

(Source: jsshinn)

vicemag:

Denmark’s Controversial Teenage Muslim Superstar Poet
Yahya Hassan is an 18-year-old Muslim Palestinian immigrant to Denmark who has become a social critic, celebrity writer, and general shit-stirrer—all thanks to a slim volume of poetry. Since the release of his self-titled debut collection in October, he’s been all over the Danish media, at least in part due to his subject matter. His poetry, written in all caps in Danish, is full of rage directed at his parents’ generation, a group of Muslims he accuses of hypocrisy and abandoning their children. He’s penned lines like:
YOU YOU’RE A MUSLIM? / YOU YOU DON’T KNOW/ IF YOU WANT HALAL OR HARAM / YOU YOU KNOW YOU WANT HARAM / BUT YOU YOU PRETEND YOU WANT HALAL / YOU YOU DON’T WANT PIG / MAY ALLAH REWARD YOU FOR YOUR FOOD HABITS.
Some of his poetry documents an abusive childhood; Yahya grew up in a poor neighborhood of Aarhus, and flirted with crime from an early age. He blames much of that on his mother and father. “As soon as our parents landed in Copenhagen airport it felt as if their role as parents was coming to an end,” Yahya told the Danish newspaper Politiken in the interview, published on October 5, that turned him into a teenage social commentator.
Continue

vicemag:

Denmark’s Controversial Teenage Muslim Superstar Poet

Yahya Hassan is an 18-year-old Muslim Palestinian immigrant to Denmark who has become a social critic, celebrity writer, and general shit-stirrer—all thanks to a slim volume of poetry. Since the release of his self-titled debut collection in October, he’s been all over the Danish media, at least in part due to his subject matter. His poetry, written in all caps in Danish, is full of rage directed at his parents’ generation, a group of Muslims he accuses of hypocrisy and abandoning their children. He’s penned lines like:

YOU YOU’RE A MUSLIM? / YOU YOU DON’T KNOW/ IF YOU WANT HALAL OR HARAM / YOU YOU KNOW YOU WANT HARAM / BUT YOU YOU PRETEND YOU WANT HALAL / YOU YOU DON’T WANT PIG / MAY ALLAH REWARD YOU FOR YOUR FOOD HABITS.

Some of his poetry documents an abusive childhood; Yahya grew up in a poor neighborhood of Aarhus, and flirted with crime from an early age. He blames much of that on his mother and father. “As soon as our parents landed in Copenhagen airport it felt as if their role as parents was coming to an end,” Yahya told the Danish newspaper Politiken in the interview, published on October 5, that turned him into a teenage social commentator.

Continue

(via muslimrave)

lordewilling:

gradientlair:

Inspired by the truth and power of #ITooAmHarvard, people of colour who are students at University of Oxford in the U.K. created #ITooAmOxford to speak of their experiences with racism on campus. The photographs are diverse (there’s more on their site) and here I included some of the ones of Black women/women of African descent (my apologies if I misread any genders) as I did when I posted my now viral post on I Too Am Harvard because again it reveals the racist assumptions about both their intelligence and appearance, something I dealt with as a Black woman when I was younger and in undergrad/grad. I also noticed the sense of “place” and nationality that impacts the stereotypes that they face. 

This is a point for the lies about racism being uniquely American to stop. Now. Today. I am tired of weekly emails from Whites ahistorically announcing how racism does not exist in the U.K. It is not their place to make that determination anyway; only Black and other people of colour can. The person who experiences the oppression, not the oppressor, the oppressed, not the privileged, speak truth to the experiences.

These students are speaking their truths. Do not ignore them. Their lives matter. They deserve better than the stress and even physical/mental health issues that dealing with racism can cause. Stereotype threat is real and impacts academic performance and health. 

I wish these students the best. Much love. 

(Any ideas about Europe being less racist than the states are straight-up bullshit, and I say this with firsthand knowledge)

(via lilhuevos-deactivated20140625)

lamaschingonaa:

pussywag0n:

lamaschingonaa:

Shout out to all our Mexican brothers and sisters who had to work late last night at bars and restaurants and clean up after gringxs while watching their culture and identity be turned into a mockery.

This is in English

I know this may come as a fucking shock to you but many Mexicans can and do speak English.

(via afghangster)

orientallyyours:

Chinese Humiliation Parade, May 10, 1938. New York City. Photographer: Peter Stackpole for LIFE Magazine.

Twelve thousand Chinese Americans from all parts of New York City, Newark, Jersey City, Baltimore, Boston, Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Washington D.C. closed their laundries and other businesses to take part in one of the largest demonstrations staged in the USA, observation China’s ‘National Humiliation Day,’ on which to pause and recall Japan’s humiliating Twenty-One Demands on China of May 9, 1915. They marched from Mott Street in Chinatown through lower Manhattan. 

A group of a hundred smiling young Chinese women in cheongsam carried a 45 x 75-feet Nationalist Chinese flag. It was reported that although no appeal was made for funds, spectators threw coins and even dollar bills onto the flag, and this appears to have been the prototype for future fundraising parades in Chinese American communities.

More info:  Kevin Scott Wong’s Americans First: Chinese Americans and the Second World War (2009)

Source: LIFE Magazine- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

(via colonelhathi)

digitaldesperados:

These photos are from the archives of the Indian Express 2013 and capture moments from when women who are widows were allowed to join the Holi celebrations. 

They say “ Breaking the shackles of tradition, around 800 widows played Holi with gulal and flowers in the land of Lord Krishna, Vrindavan in four-day Holi celebrations that began on March 24. 

Vrindavan Holi is an effort to free widows from the shackles of age-old tradition. Not only will the widows play Holi, they will also participate in cultural programmes.

The widows feel such celebrations would prove to be an unprecedented step towards ending social prejudice against them. The event this year may need some amount of change in the mindset of the society.

However, the ‘breaking’ of traditions by widows in Vrindavan has drawn criticism from a section of religious leaders who believe that it is an ‘infringement of our ancient culture’.

In the past, widows living in the ashrams could have played Holi only with Thakurji (Lord Krishna).

A veteran in the popular Ram Lila act, Shankar Lal Chaturvedi criticised the event, saying, ‘The manner in which they smeared face of each other with gulal is not good.’ ”

The photos show the women (who are widows) praying, tossing flowers and generally celebrating Holi at at the Meera Sahavagini ashram in Vrindavan.



(via vincecarters)

whitecolonialism:

Emancipation Inclusion and Exclusion: A Look Into Slavery in Brazil.

Brazil was the last nation on the Western Hemisphere to outlaw slavery, by the time slavery had been abolished in 1888, an estimated four million African slaves had been imported into Brazil, making up 40% of the total number of slaves brought into the Americas. The images above display the faces of the driving force behind Brazils economy for centuries. 

After outlawing slavery in 1888 Brazil initiated a national campaign known as branquemento, translated into English as “whitening,” with the purpose of whitening the face of Brazil. Brazil attempted to accomplish this by inviting white immigrants into the nation as well as encouraging Blacks to marry whites. Through inter-marriage the Brazilian elite was hopeful that the Brazilian population would acquire lighter skin. 

Despite Brazils numerous attempts to make the nation appear whiter and less Black, today 50.7% of the Brazilian population or 97 million Brazilians identify with their African ancestry for the first time in it’s history since records began.

"People are no longer scared of identifying themselves or insecure about saying: ‘I’m black, and black is beautiful.’"

- Elio Ferreira de Araujo, Brazil’s minister for racial equality, describes why there is a rise in the number of Brazilians who identify as Black.

vicemag:

Denmark’s Controversial Teenage Muslim Superstar Poet
Yahya Hassan is an 18-year-old Muslim Palestinian immigrant to Denmark who has become a social critic, celebrity writer, and general shit-stirrer—all thanks to a slim volume of poetry. Since the release of his self-titled debut collection in October, he’s been all over the Danish media, at least in part due to his subject matter. His poetry, written in all caps in Danish, is full of rage directed at his parents’ generation, a group of Muslims he accuses of hypocrisy and abandoning their children. He’s penned lines like:
YOU YOU’RE A MUSLIM? / YOU YOU DON’T KNOW/ IF YOU WANT HALAL OR HARAM / YOU YOU KNOW YOU WANT HARAM / BUT YOU YOU PRETEND YOU WANT HALAL / YOU YOU DON’T WANT PIG / MAY ALLAH REWARD YOU FOR YOUR FOOD HABITS.
Some of his poetry documents an abusive childhood; Yahya grew up in a poor neighborhood of Aarhus, and flirted with crime from an early age. He blames much of that on his mother and father. “As soon as our parents landed in Copenhagen airport it felt as if their role as parents was coming to an end,” Yahya told the Danish newspaper Politiken in the interview, published on October 5, that turned him into a teenage social commentator.
Continue

vicemag:

Denmark’s Controversial Teenage Muslim Superstar Poet

Yahya Hassan is an 18-year-old Muslim Palestinian immigrant to Denmark who has become a social critic, celebrity writer, and general shit-stirrer—all thanks to a slim volume of poetry. Since the release of his self-titled debut collection in October, he’s been all over the Danish media, at least in part due to his subject matter. His poetry, written in all caps in Danish, is full of rage directed at his parents’ generation, a group of Muslims he accuses of hypocrisy and abandoning their children. He’s penned lines like:

YOU YOU’RE A MUSLIM? / YOU YOU DON’T KNOW/ IF YOU WANT HALAL OR HARAM / YOU YOU KNOW YOU WANT HARAM / BUT YOU YOU PRETEND YOU WANT HALAL / YOU YOU DON’T WANT PIG / MAY ALLAH REWARD YOU FOR YOUR FOOD HABITS.

Some of his poetry documents an abusive childhood; Yahya grew up in a poor neighborhood of Aarhus, and flirted with crime from an early age. He blames much of that on his mother and father. “As soon as our parents landed in Copenhagen airport it felt as if their role as parents was coming to an end,” Yahya told the Danish newspaper Politiken in the interview, published on October 5, that turned him into a teenage social commentator.

Continue

(via muslimrave)