Immigrant Stories: How did you come to US?

Celebrating the Immigrant in all of US--even you, yes you

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

not quite white: a documentary exploring the construction of whiteness in the united states as applied to arab and slavic immigrants drawing upon the filmmaker’s own syrian and polish/slovak heritage.

(via suumaq)

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

not quite white: a documentary exploring the construction of whiteness in the united states as applied to arab and slavic immigrants drawing upon the filmmaker’s own syrian and polish/slovak heritage.

(via suumaq)

rockpilemuseum:

Yesterday was my first visit to Heart Mountain and I was not disappointed. The story of the Japanese-American internment during World War II is very powerful and the exhibits at the interpretive center really illustrate what life was like for the people interned outside of Powell from 1942 to 1945.  The voice of the exhibits is that of the internees and they discuss their experience and the varying reactions and responses to their imprisonment.  Some accepted the process while other resisted. Some young Japanese-American men refused the draft while others joined the military and fought bravely in Europe. Overall the center challenges visitors to think about social justice and constitutional and civil rights in America at that time, in any war time, and today. Heart Mountain is a must-see if you are traveling to Cody or beyond. This is a time in our collective history that is worth reflecting upon and thinking about as we grapple with civil rights questions moving forward in our country.  The center has a growing collection of archival materials and oral histories and has some great plans for bringing some original barracks back to the land and rehabbing an original root cellar used by the internees.  It appears that there is a bright future for the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center.  

- Registrar Robert Henning

(via dangercupcakemurdericing)

justatinysootsprite:

What, are we taking everybody?

the reason that this line is significant is because jim morita was a japanese-american soldier. while it’s never explicitly stated, here’s what morita’s life would have been like before being captured by HYDRA:

  • december 7, 1942:  the empire of japan attacked pearl harbor. he was probably a soldier at this time since he was considered to be elite enough for steve’s squad; unknown where he served, although there were many japanese-american soldiers who died in and who were the first responders to the attack.
  • december 8, 1942:  the us declares a state of war with japan.
  • all japanese-american men disqualified from the draft via the label “4-C,” or “enemy alien,” no matter their citizenry. all japanese-american men in the service are removed from duty.
  • february 19, 1942:  president roosevelt signed executive order 9066, authorizing the military to exclude certain groups from military zones.
  • the fbi searched the homes of japanese-americans for “contraband,” including correspondence with anyone in japan such as personal letters. any such contraband is confiscated.
  • (fun sidenote:  how did they know where to find these people so that they could be harassed? well, gosh, the census bureau told them. illegally. no big deal.)
  • community leaders, including priests, gathered up and sent to prison camps like tule lake. this is also where several families were sent to be deported to japan since they were not deemed loyal enough.
  • 122,000 people of japanese-american descent are told to sell or store their property as they can only bring what they can carry out of the “exclusion zones,” which meant most of the west coast. (hawaii, whose population was about a quarter japanese, was for the most part not included in this.) given only a few weeks to organize their lives, they were then sent via cattle train to concentration camps set up throughout the us.
  • since morita was from fresno, he would have ended up here:
    charming.
  • sunny poston, arizona. conveniently built on an indian reservation against the wishes of the tribal council, who wanted nothing to do with the government’s white supremacist bullshit. why only infringe on the rights and wishes of one minority group, right?
  • choice quote:   ”After fifteen months at Arizona’s vast Poston Relocation Center as a social analyst, Commander Leighton concluded that many an American simply fails to remember that U.S. Japanese are human beings.”
  • shortly after arriving, all prisoners were asked to fill out a survey. most of the questions would be simple, like their name, city of birth, etc, but questions 27 and 28 were different.
  • question 27:  Are you willing to serve in the armed forces of the United States on combat duty, wherever ordered?
  • question 28:  Will you swear unqualified allegiance to the United States of America and faithfully defend the United States from any and all attacks by foreign and domestic forces, and forswear any form of allegiance or disobedience to the Japanese Emperor, or any other foreign government, power, or organization?
  • did you answer yes to both? congratulations! you’re a soldier. did you answer no to both? perhaps you’re too old or sick to serve? perhaps the general fuckery of this entire situation got you down? perhaps you were born outside of the us, so you can’t disavow your country of origin since there is a very real chance you’ll be deported? haha well congratulations hope you like prison and/or deportation
  • so all of this goes on
  • and then morita goes on to serve
  • and get captured
  • and rescued
  • and dumbass doogan says, “what, are we taking everybody?”
  • fuck you
  • i’m from fresno

(Source: harlequinnade, via amurrrka)

iwannaseeitall:

kanesus:

robocop0015:

poppedamalikimsweating:

Suey Park about the new ABC sitcom, Fresh Off the Boat based off of the book Fresh Off the Boat: A Memoir by Eddie Huang. After watching the trailer released by ABC, she addressed the show’s several shortcomings including: a criminal misrepresentation of the Chinese and Taiwanese community (by the use of Korean American actors), the manipulation of the term “Asian” to erase heterogeneity between cultures, an immigrant stereotype perpetuating premise, and the use of FOB as an identifier when it is clearly used against immigrant poc. (x,x,x,x,x,x)

What’s stupid is I’m pretty sure Koreans are Asian too right? How is that a problem, they do look a lot alike as a community what the hell is this how’s problem ?

You’re right while we’re at it we should replace 80% of white actors in Hollywood with giant expired containers of molded ass cottage cheese y’all look a lot alike as a community anyway

When I read a ton of posts cheering that there was finally a show featuring an Asian family on prime time, I thought it was going to be an amazing trailer. Then I watched it.

That trailer made me feel so uncomfortable - especially the part where they have the black kid call the main character a “chink”.

This is something that I’ve been noticing a lot on television. When a show has to deal with racism, they always address the issue through another person of color because portraying a white person as racist seems to make writers and audiences uncomfortable.

This recently happened on Glee when Sam said a slew of ignorant and problematic things about his black girlfriend, Mercedes, in front of her black friends. When Mercedes began to worry about dating a white boy as a result, it was made to look like she was the racist party… ???

And now here, you have a black boy telling the main character that since he was the low man on the totem pole before, he’s eager to pass on the torch to the new man of color in town and perpetuate racism… Okay then.

It just rubs me the wrong way - on top of all the other awful stereotypical representations of Chinese and immigrant people in that trailer.

I didn’t laugh once.

(via strawberreli)

The Middle Passage journey from West Africa to the Americas took 4 to 6 months.

Try walking around without wiping your butt for a day or a week. Yep now try laying down in shit for 4-6 weeks, most of it isnt your own. Then add some blood and some mucus. Then grab some chains. Slavery was that bad. dont u ever fucking tell me it wasnt! (via howtobenoladarling)

Not to mention every now and then you were raped by those that were working the ships.  Male and female were raped.

(via theafrosistuh)

24 hrs laying in extremely tight positions with hundreds of people that are suffering from all kinds of diseases due to malnutrition. Weather wasnt always the way the ship owners planned and voyages took longer than usually, the longest I was told by a professor was a whole year. 

(via madonnawhorereject)

Most people have no idea what happened to our ancestors, and that’s due to the fact that the powers that be want to act like it never happened.  

(via paranoidsuperhero)

Reblogging some real shit from my Liked posts. Because fuck you.

(via bludclotartattack)

And let’s add on the fact that ships have to make port and re-supply and between Africa and America lay the Caribbean and South America, which still took a great deal more to travel to. So families were separated not only by death and torment, but by members being sold off on a different continent than where they might have been bound.

Not to mention ships get blown off course, and the slave next to you might have died and you have to sleep next to a corpse for who knows how long before the crew finally decides to handle it and toss it overboard like so much offal.

Sharks still follow the course of the slave trade ships till this day due to the amount of offal and human bodies that were tossed overboard in the ship’s wake.

(via thegoddamazon)

(Damn is that last thing about sharks true?!)

Yes. They threw so many bodies overboard it changed the ecological feeding patterns of sharks. They follow the slave ships from dock to port. They were even used as an act of terrorism to force Africans on to ships and encourage them not to commit suicide. Slave ships were often packed for collateral damage. It was estimated that many would not make the journey and all those bodies thrown overboard were insured. That’s how insurance companies got their start… It’s also how many families built their family fortune.


This was a business.

(via howtobeterrell)

FOREVER reblog.

(via face--the--strange)

somepalestiniankid:

jewishpolitics:

blardenfrazifonochip:

jewishpolitics:

blardenfrazifonochip:

You know, even though I’m anti Israel now, saying that I didn’t have a very good time on Birthright almost three years ago would be lying, and now whenever I see someone on my Facebook newsfeed talk about how they’re going to go, or when they post pictures from their trip, it ‘s painful, because…

Israel is not a colony it is a country. You didn’t help colonialism because Israel is a country and not subject to the rule of any foreign entity. Israel is a legally established nation and has a right to its land.

It’s not colonialism nor is it imperialism. Israel is a great nation full of freedom, innovation, and equal rights.

Yes I did help colonialism because I was benefiting the Israeli economy, which funds the displacement of the Palestinian people on a daily basis.

Israel is a great nation full of freedom, innovation, and equal rights.
Tell that to the Arabs and Ethiopians who reside in Israel.

Would that be the same Arabs and Ethiopian Jews who have equal rights and are Israeli citizens? Or do you mean the Palestinians who live in this so called “Palestine” and the illegal Ethiopians who are causing havoc in Tel Aviv? 

lmaooooooooooooo

What is it to leave a place? What is it to question your own memory of that place? What is it to have this innate connection to a place in which you don’t live at anymore? How can you keep generating a collective and cultural memory which you know you’re very much implicated in and very much spiritually connected to but meanwhile, the connections are very frayed… but meanwhile, they are overwhelmingly strong. The poem for me becomes a way to give contour to all these provisional, competing, difficult, contestatory, generous, poignant, ridiculous notions of home, war, how do you tell a story?

—Myung Mi Kim, in Between the Lines: Asian American Women’s Poetry (2001)

(Source: bloomroot)

vicemag:

Denmark’s Controversial Teenage Muslim Superstar Poet
Yahya Hassan is an 18-year-old Muslim Palestinian immigrant to Denmark who has become a social critic, celebrity writer, and general shit-stirrer—all thanks to a slim volume of poetry. Since the release of his self-titled debut collection in October, he’s been all over the Danish media, at least in part due to his subject matter. His poetry, written in all caps in Danish, is full of rage directed at his parents’ generation, a group of Muslims he accuses of hypocrisy and abandoning their children. He’s penned lines like:
YOU YOU’RE A MUSLIM? / YOU YOU DON’T KNOW/ IF YOU WANT HALAL OR HARAM / YOU YOU KNOW YOU WANT HARAM / BUT YOU YOU PRETEND YOU WANT HALAL / YOU YOU DON’T WANT PIG / MAY ALLAH REWARD YOU FOR YOUR FOOD HABITS.
Some of his poetry documents an abusive childhood; Yahya grew up in a poor neighborhood of Aarhus, and flirted with crime from an early age. He blames much of that on his mother and father. “As soon as our parents landed in Copenhagen airport it felt as if their role as parents was coming to an end,” Yahya told the Danish newspaper Politiken in the interview, published on October 5, that turned him into a teenage social commentator.
Continue

vicemag:

Denmark’s Controversial Teenage Muslim Superstar Poet

Yahya Hassan is an 18-year-old Muslim Palestinian immigrant to Denmark who has become a social critic, celebrity writer, and general shit-stirrer—all thanks to a slim volume of poetry. Since the release of his self-titled debut collection in October, he’s been all over the Danish media, at least in part due to his subject matter. His poetry, written in all caps in Danish, is full of rage directed at his parents’ generation, a group of Muslims he accuses of hypocrisy and abandoning their children. He’s penned lines like:

YOU YOU’RE A MUSLIM? / YOU YOU DON’T KNOW/ IF YOU WANT HALAL OR HARAM / YOU YOU KNOW YOU WANT HARAM / BUT YOU YOU PRETEND YOU WANT HALAL / YOU YOU DON’T WANT PIG / MAY ALLAH REWARD YOU FOR YOUR FOOD HABITS.

Some of his poetry documents an abusive childhood; Yahya grew up in a poor neighborhood of Aarhus, and flirted with crime from an early age. He blames much of that on his mother and father. “As soon as our parents landed in Copenhagen airport it felt as if their role as parents was coming to an end,” Yahya told the Danish newspaper Politiken in the interview, published on October 5, that turned him into a teenage social commentator.

Continue

(via muslimrave)