Immigrant Stories: How did you come to US?

Celebrating the Immigrant in all of US--even you, yes you

elizajumel:

the first female chinese immigrant to america was a sixteen-year-old girl who was part of a cultural exhibit where she sat in a life-size diorama and people watched her eat with chopsticks while wearing silk clothes and that’s really all you need to know about the commodification of chinese women

(Source: watermillions, via somepalestiniankid)

It Took Me Two Years to Realize My Boyfriend Was Racist

(Source: thisisnotjapan, via asiansnotstudying)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Los Angeles: Action in Support of Child Refugees & Central American Migrants
Monday, July 7 - 12 noon
Downtown Federal Building, 300 N. Los Angeles St.
Central Americans and Allies call on President Obama to Rescind his call to Fastrack-Deportation of Minors and to Divert $2 billion away from Militarizing the Border In response to the current humanitarian crisis evidenced by the unprecedented number of Central American child migrants seeking refuge in the United States,Southern California based organizations will protest President Obama’s harmful policies towards refugee children on Monday, July 7 at 12:30pm at the Downtown Los Angeles Federal Building. As U.S. citizens, residents, concerned civilians, organizations, community, legal experts, and families of the detained and deported, we have a moral and legal responsibility to demand that the United States government halt traumatizing and further damaging the already scarred lives of these child migrants. We demand that the children be reunited with their families, that deportations stop, and that we take humanitarian –rather than ruthless– steps towards solving this humanitarian crisis.WHO: Human Rights Alliance for Child Refugees and Families includes local organizations, families, and legal experts concerned with the treatment and rights of Central American child migrantsWHERE: Downtown LA Federal Building300 North Los Angeles Street Los Angeles, CA 90012WHAT: PROTEST/RALLY/PRESS CONFERENCE IN SUPPORT OF CHILD REFUGEESWHEN: Monday, July 7, 2014. 12:00 PMPLEASE DISTRIBUTE THIS INVITATION WIDELY

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Los Angeles: Action in Support of Child Refugees & Central American Migrants

Monday, July 7 - 12 noon

Downtown Federal Building, 300 N. Los Angeles St.

Central Americans and Allies call on President Obama to Rescind his call to Fastrack-Deportation of Minors and to Divert $2 billion away from Militarizing the Border 

In response to the current humanitarian crisis evidenced by the unprecedented number of Central American child migrants seeking refuge in the United States,Southern California based organizations will protest President Obama’s harmful policies towards refugee children on Monday, July 7 at 12:30pm at the Downtown Los Angeles Federal Building. 

As U.S. citizens, residents, concerned civilians, organizations, community, legal experts, and families of the detained and deported, we have a moral and legal responsibility to demand that the United States government halt traumatizing and further damaging the already scarred lives of these child migrants. We demand that the children be reunited with their families, that deportations stop, and that we take humanitarian –rather than ruthless– steps towards solving this humanitarian crisis.

WHO: Human Rights Alliance for Child Refugees and Families includes local organizations, families, and legal experts concerned with the treatment and rights of Central American child migrants

WHERE: Downtown LA Federal Building
300 North Los Angeles Street Los Angeles, CA 90012

WHAT: PROTEST/RALLY/PRESS CONFERENCE IN SUPPORT OF CHILD REFUGEES

WHEN: Monday, July 7, 2014. 12:00 PM

PLEASE DISTRIBUTE THIS INVITATION WIDELY

(via espirituserpentino)

Here’s to the security guards who maybe had a degree in another land. Here’s to the manicurist who had to leave her family to come here, painting the nails, scrubbing the feet of strangers. Here’s to the janitors who don’t even fucking understand English yet work hard despite it all. Here’s to the fast food workers who work hard to see their family smile. Here’s to the laundry man at the Marriott who told me with the sparkle in his eyes how he was an engineer in Peru. Here’s to the bus driver, the Turkish Sufi who almost danced when I quoted Rumi. Here’s to the harvesters who live in fear of being deported for coming here to open the road for their future generation. Here’s to the taxi drivers from Nigeria, Ghana, Egypt and India who gossip amongst themselves. Here is to them waking up at 4am, calling home to hear the voices of their loved ones. Here is to their children, to the children who despite it all become artists, writers, teachers, doctors, lawyers, activists and rebels. Here’s to Western Union and Money Gram. For never forgetting home. Here’s to their children who carry the heartbeats of their motherland and even in sleep, speak with pride about their fathers. Keep on.

Immigrants. First generation.


Ijeoma Umebinyuo.

(via theijeoma)

(via somepalestiniankid)

The Moko Returns: More Than A Tattoo

nitanahkohe:

i wouldn’t say that these practices have been dead for hundreds of years (like there are Klamath River tribes that have always had at least a few women with traditional tattoos, to the best of my knowledge), but they definitely are not common the way they used to be. cool to see women revitalizing these traditions, and awesome to see our indigenous Maori relatives across the ocean helping them do that. 

sjaejones:

somethingvain:

stuffhappening:

all autocompletes were screenshots of actual searches on 12/3/2013

photo credit: Mike Allen

This Photoshoot

The idea was inspired by the UN Women campaign by Memac Ogilvy & Mather Dubai. 

Racism from Absence

In my 19 years in America, I’ve never been stopped and frisked. Cops are always nice to me. People have no problems sitting next to me on the bus. No one’s scared of me no matter what direction I pointed my cap. 

The kind of Asian racism that makes headlines is cultural misappropriation -when some “insensitive” entertainer wears silk kimonos and painted faces to look exotic.

This never bothered me.

It’s the subtle, slippery racism that’s far more sinister. The absence of Asian leads in a non-martial arts movie or TV shows means I grew up knowing only non-Asian celebrities and role models. And if you’re an Asian guy, you are not the stuff of fantasies girls grew up dreaming about.

The absence of Asians from politics and upper management means that Asians can be hard workers and geniuses but never leaders.

Above all, there seems to be some perma-foreignness about Asians. It’s not unusual to be told to “go back to China” and to be mocked for an accent we don’t have. The manifestations of this viewpoint range from the seemingly harmless to the outright hostile. But the underlying message is the same. Asians are not real Americans.

Inspirational Racism

I vividly remember seeing this racism first-hand in a conversation with one of my former business partners. I wanted to create a mentoring program in a predominantly Asian school organization.

He flat out told me he had no interest in helping Asians succeed in America. I asked him, “Are you serious?” He said, “Yeah.” He laughed a little.

He was serious.

It was a wtf moment for many reasons and was a major factor behind my decision to leave my position as a co-founder. I eventually heard from a mutual friend that he said I was a follower not a leader.

In retrospect, I’m fortunate to have heard him verbalize something that others keep to themselves. It allowed me to move on to bigger and better things instead of wasting time working with someone who never saw me as a partner. 

This is the most important post I’ve seen in a while. Racism from absence is something that is predominant here on tumblr, which is shocking because this is the most politically correct and representative platform I have in my life. It’s not okay to joke about transgendered individuals, it’s not okay to joke about racism against black people, but apparently it is always okay to joke about Asians. Perhaps it’s because the internet is so US-centric, but the only POCs I’ve ever seen recognized or represented seem to be african-american/black, and calls for the end of institutionalized racism tend to ignore the equally long history of oppresion many Asian countries have suffered, and Asian immigrants in western countries continue to suffer. Ask yourself this: in a world where Asians make up the majority of the global population, have you ever seen Asian individuals valorized for anything other than being aberrations of the Asian culture? Wait- can you even name more than 10 Asian individuals valorized to the extent of mainstream popularity? 

As an Asian in an international school, I’ve seen this type of subtle racism enacted every single day. When I work hard to achieve something and the results reflect my hard work, the response I most typically hear is “it’s because you’re Asian.” To hear that the hours I put into trying to be the best individual I could possibly be, coming home at 9PM after gymnastics to do homework late into the night and sleeping at insanely late hours or trying to balance Junior Achievement with community service, were not enough to gain recognition as Jasmine Chia and not simply another faceless slant-eyed member of the Asian ethnicity makes me truly wonder what it takes for an Asian to be represented in this world. My experience is something familiar to any other Asian who has had contact with the Western world:

Here is what I sometimes suspect my face signifies to other Americans: an invisible person, barely distinguishable from a mass of faces that resemble it. A conspicuous person standing apart from the crowd and yet devoid of any individuality. An icon of so much that the culture pretends to honor but that it in fact patronizes and exploits. Not just people “who are good at math” and play the violin, but a mass of stifled, repressed, abused, conformist quasi-robots who simply do not matter, socially or culturally. (source)

Next time we ask for POC representation in media, don’t forget Asians. Next time we see a piece of Asian amazingness, whether it’s He Kexin on the beam or Doona Bae in Cloud Atlas, take the time to humanize them instead of thinking of them simply as representatives of the Chinese gymnastics industry or the rising Korean wave of actors. When an Asian person is genuinely good at music, recognize that they worked hard for it. When an Asian chess prodigy wins the world championship, learn their name and not just the country they come from. Don’t pretend to get angry on behalf of geishas at cultural appropriation if you don’t stand up for the fact that cultural appropriation is the only form of recognition we get in mainstream media. 

Racism from absence is a powerful one.

(via jennli123)

longlostpoet:

Over 200 kids taken from their families. Homes destroyed and bombed. Every city and school is invaded. Please pray for Palestine please please things are only getting worse.

(Source: palestinianpapi)

trotskay:

went to an American restaurant today!!!! ‘ello mate!!!!!! put forks in my hair to show my love for these Westerners’ food!!! Haha!!!!! Ha!!!! Ha!!! Ha!!! Ha  !

(Source: leninistvaporwave, via afternoonsnoozebutton)

dynamicafrica:

Here’s how the world’s best would stack up in a World Cup with no first-generation immigrants.

With the current anti-immigrant sentiment sweeping many parts of the Western world gaining more and more traction, Global Post has taken on the conservative approach to this issue and applied strict immigration policies to the teams of the 2014 World Cup.

Global Post compiled the list by selecting only the group favorites and the “big losers.” Not all players are represented as they focused solely on those who are the most integral in their respective teams.

From their list, we’ve selected a few teams that represent the most black players, players of African descent and those whose background is related to Africa or the diaspora in some way.

ITALY:
Italy loses  Fiorentina forward Giuseppe Rossi was born in New Jersey and AC Milan striker Mario Balotelli, born in Palermo, has parents who immigrated from Ghana.

FRANCE:
France can hardly field a team without its immigrants. It drops Bacary Sagna and Mamadou Sakho, whose parents were born in Senegal, and Patrice Evra, who was born there. It also loses Blaise Matuidi, whose father was born in Angola; Eliaquim Mangala, whose parents were born in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rio Mavuba, whose father was born in Zaire and mother in Angola, Moussa Sissoko, whose parents were born in Mali; and Marseille midfielder Matthieu Valbuena, whose father was born in Spain. And don’t look for as much flash without Karim Benzema, whose father was born in Algeria. France also loses Paul Pogba, whose parents were born in Guinea.

GHANA:
Ghana keeps Kevin-Prince Boateng and gets back Jerome Boateng from Germany — their father was born in Ghana, though the brothers were born in Berlin. The same goes for  Jordan Ayew, whose parents were born in Ghana though he was born in France. As a final bonus, Ghana picks up AC Milan striker Mario Balotelli, whose biological parents were born in Ghana, from Italy. It also gets Danny Welbeck, whose parents were born in Ghana, from England.

GERMANY:
Germany lose superstar Arsenal midfielder Mesut Ozil, whose father was born in Turkey; Real Madrid midfielder Sami Khedira, whose father was born in Tunisia; and Lazio striker Miroslav Klose, who was born in Poland. They’ll also take the field without Bayern Munich defender Jerome Boateng, who has roots in Ghana; Sampdori defender Shkodran Mustafi, whose parents are Albanians born in Macedonia; and Lukas Podolski, who was born in Poland.

PORTUGAL:
Portugal loses Real Madrid defender Kepler Laveran Lima Ferreira, aka Pepe, to his native Brazil. It loses Fenerbahce S.K. Defender Bruno Alves, whose father was born in Brazil. It also drops Luis Carlos Almeida da Cunha, aka Nani, who was born in Cape Verde (independent from Portugal since 1975), and FC Porto winger Silvestre Varela, whose parents were born there. Lucky for them, Real Madrid striker Cristiano Ronaldo, whose great grandmother was from Cape Verde, isn’t an immigrant by our rules.

USA:
Tthe melting-pot nation loses Sunderland striker Jozy Altidore, whose parents were born in Haiti; Tim Howard, whose mother is Hungarian; AZ striker Aron Johannsson, who was born to Icelandic parents in Alabama; and Rosenborg midfielder Mix Diskerud, who was born in Norway. We’ll also take away LA Galaxy defender Omar Gonzalez, whose parents were born in Mexico, and Nantes midfielder Alejandro Bedoya, whose father was born in Colombia.

BELGIUM:
The fathers of both Manchester City defender Vincent Kompany and Everton striker Romelu Lukaku were born in what is today the Democratic Republic of Congo. Everton striker Kevin Mirallas’ father was born in Spain. Marouane Fellaini’s parents were born in Morocco. FC Zenit Saint Petersburgmidfielder Axel Witsel’s father is from France. And Tottenham Hotspur midfielder Mousa Dembele’s father was born in Mali.

(edited from source)

H/T katebomz

weareallmixedup:

Slur tw

(I’m sorry I’m submitting this on anonymous I just don’t feel comfortable giving out these details of my family history and experiences with my url attached).

For the purposes of this discussion I have lived in West Africa and Europe, and I’m mixed (yes that is how I identify) with African and Afro-Latinx. I identify as an ethnically mixed mono-racial black person.

I, like the Filipino/Indian submission I am feeling incredibly angry and hurt at the things Jay has said. Growing up I know for my sibling especially they has light skin, black, blonde and red hair, they sticks out like a sore thumb when they’re with our family, their identity issues are valid, their experiences are valid and their identity as a mixed person is valid, and I won’t let anyone invalidate that ever. They has also been bullied by people including our close family members for the shape of her eyes (which I guess can be attributed to some distant native ancestry we have) and gets called ch*nk constantly. For me and my other siblings it was the opposite we have dark skin and kinky hair, whenever we talk about our afro-latinx side people actually laugh in our faces and tell us there is no way dark people like us are good enough to be latinx. I used to be too scared to talk about that side of my heritage because I was sick of people arguing with me about where I am from, or telling me that I’m just black and I am just trying to be special (despite the fact that I have never disputed being black on both sides). The prejudice within my family is immense too and we have effectively been exorcised and disowned because we’re not good enough for our afro-latinx relatives. This is the reality of our lives you are belittling and it is incredibly hurtful.

Personally for me I am also in a relationship with a black person of another ethnicity (they are mixed ethnicty as well), and between us we have three cultures and six languages to pass down to our children. We are constantly talking about how to deal with these issues and how to balance our ties to our heritages so we can help any children we have form an identity, If our kids wanted to identify as mixed would you deny them too? My African’s family discrimination towards my partner is huge and it is solely on the basis of his ethnicity, they do not care that we are both black! My family have threatened me because of our relationship and tried to force me to end our relationship.

Having said all this I am also aware that multiracial people face unique issues that I as a monoracial person (even though I am multiethnic) can’t quite fully understand. Our struggles overlap and I feel a sense of solidarity with multiracial people but they are not exactly the same. I also recognize that multiracial people face unique issues and that’s why blogs like this are so important. I have been quietly following this blog for a long time, because I identify with the experiences (not all as I am not multiracial but a lot of them). Now I’m not sure what to do, I feel like I should unfollow because you guys don’t even recognise my identity as valid but I feel attached to this blog also. I

——————————

We don’t want you to unfollow. We’re still talking about how to reconcile the whole matter. We never said monoracial multiethnic POC don’t face discrimination or identity issues. But this blog is primarily for multiracial people. Maybe it’ll change but currently we are not equipped for monoracial multiethnic persons. It’d be unfair to everyone if we suddenly changed our focus. Throughout this entire discussion no one has ever said that monoracial multiethnic POC could start their own blog. We’ve historically allowed people such as transracial adoptees to interact with us because they haven’t had their own space and like monoracial multiethnic persons, we have a lot in common. But we all have out own areas that are unique or more difficult or more common for each of us. We all need people and spaces with people who understand that for personal experience. There are many issues to discuss for this topic. The usage of the word mixed to mean mixed race is definitely US centric. I’ll have to get used to the fact that people outside the US and/or people who are X generation immigrants use the term differently. I’m sorry that I spoke out of complete ignorance but going forward I’ll say “mixed race” because honestly, as you can tell, I know little to nothing about social issues, especially ethnic issues outside the US. To be frank, You may feel a sense of a solidarity with multiracial people but I still don’t know if I can let my guard down, especially when monoracial multiethnic people are coming here and basically demanding that we accept them without argument or discussion. I have one black parent and one white parent. They are complete opposites in the racial hierarchy in every way in the entire world and somehow I exist. I’m not saying my feelings are right but isn’t it possible neither of us are wrong? Despite my personal feelings, I’ll continue to be open to hearing people out, especially those who aren’t tied to the US. But please do not keep insisting that multiracial people need to accept everything monoracial multiethnic persons say without question. — Jay (Ps when saying monoracial multiethnic, I mean POC. White people, this discussion isn’t about or for you.)

In Germany, migrants from ‘Muslim countries’ applying for nationality are required to pass a discriminatory ‘Muslim Test’ which asks questions such as: What would you do if your son was gay? In the Netherlands, applicants are asked to react to a video showing two men kissing…it is not incidental that the attention drawn to non-Western and Muslim gender and sexual regimes comes at the same time as the ‘War on Terror’, the increase in restrictive migration policies and the general upsurge in Islamophobia…‘gay rights’ and gender equality, even though they were achieved very recently and not at all exhaustively, have become symbols of the civilization and modernity of Western countries. While the importance of these (even if limited) rights and equality is not disputed, the authors warn against a white Western single-issue emancipatory politics that claims universality and patronizes non-white non-Western Muslim women and queers, while serving neo-imperialistic, racist discourses. It seems rather obvious to draw a parallel with how Western feminist abolitionists feed into security laws that criminalize migrant sex workers and effectively lead to deportation and further marginalisation in the name of combating gender violence. The same societies that demonize and discriminate against Muslims are increasingly criminalizing sex workers, using ideas about both homophobia and gender violence as their tools to deport and detain migrants, sex workers and people of colour.