Immigrant Stories: How did you come to US?

Celebrating the Immigrant in all of US--even you, yes you

A dark area rising on the Titanic - A descendant of the only black family on the Titanic said she is determined to keep the memory of her ancestors alive giving them their rightful place in history. Marlie Alberts said she is a descendant of the H...

weareallmixedup:

prominent-afro-history:

prominent-afro-history.tumblr.com/archive

"According to reports, Laroche’s mother had sent the family first-class tickets to travel on a French liner. But before its departure, the Laroches discovered there would be a seating and dining problem for the interracial family. Out of concern for their youngest daughter, who was sickly, they traded their tickets for second-class tickets on the Titanic."

christiancgtomas:

I was speaking out of irritation at the ignorant comments that were being made at Las Vegas’ First Black Film Festival, and someone I know made this lovely little comment so I had put my two cents in. Some arguments I made were grammatically unsound (that very last sentence, yikes), but whatevs. It’s 10 PM and I have to go to bed.

(via weareallmixedup)

A #Republican Path to Citizenship – Via Boot Camp via @YahooFinance #immigration

(Source: conspiracytheorist79, via immigrationnewsdigest)

olitadealtamar:

Action at Broadview demanding that deportations stop! #2million2many #not1more

olitadealtamar:

Action at Broadview demanding that deportations stop! #2million2many #not1more

dynamicafrica:

Lupita Nyong’o lands top beauty gig as new face of Lancôme.
After being featured in numerous magazines from Vogue to Vanity Fair, and being chosen as one of the representatives of Miu Miu’s Spring 2014 campaign, Oscar-winning Kenyan actress Lupita Nyong’o has been announced as the new face of top French beauty brand Lancôme. Even though many of us are already familiar with her gorgeous face, the beauty brand ambassador will now be seen all over the world and I can’t help being excited at that thought.
This comes as no surprise as the actress and filmmaker is not only known for incredible thespian talents, she also consistently manages to leave us all in awe as she pulls off one beauty and fashion look after another.
Concerning her new role, Nyong’o remarked, “I am particularly proud to represent [Lancôme’s] unique vision for women and the idea that beauty should not be dictated, but should instead be an expression of a woman’s freedom to be herself.”
Connect with Dynamic Africa on:
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter
All Africa, All the time.

dynamicafrica:

Lupita Nyong’o lands top beauty gig as new face of Lancôme.

After being featured in numerous magazines from Vogue to Vanity Fair, and being chosen as one of the representatives of Miu Miu’s Spring 2014 campaign, Oscar-winning Kenyan actress Lupita Nyong’o has been announced as the new face of top French beauty brand Lancôme. Even though many of us are already familiar with her gorgeous face, the beauty brand ambassador will now be seen all over the world and I can’t help being excited at that thought.

This comes as no surprise as the actress and filmmaker is not only known for incredible thespian talents, she also consistently manages to leave us all in awe as she pulls off one beauty and fashion look after another.

Concerning her new role, Nyong’o remarked, “I am particularly proud to represent [Lancôme’s] unique vision for women and the idea that beauty should not be dictated, but should instead be an expression of a woman’s freedom to be herself.”

Connect with Dynamic Africa on:

Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter

All Africa, All the time.

(via sherrrni)

winnememwintuvoice:

winnememwintuvoice:

— WE ARE FIGHTING FOR OUR CULTURAL SURVIVAL — We were flooded out, and not compensated, with the building of Shasta Dam in 1945, and now Westlands Water District and the Federal Government are pushing to do it again. This latest proposal would inundate or damage more than 40 sacred sites, including our Coming of Age ceremony place on the Winnemem Waywaqat (McCloud River). Representative Jim Costa, of Fresno, has introduced a bill, co-signed by a number of California Democratic Congressmen, to raise the dam. No mention of the standing debt to our people. Is your U.S. representative Doug LaMalfa? You can make a difference to support Winnemem Wintu cultural survival by telling him not to authorize the proposal to raise Shasta Dam by 18.5 feet. You can call LaMalfa at (530) 223-5897 or email him by filling out this online form: https://lamalfa.house.gov/contact/email-me Here is a sample letter you can use: http://www.winnememwintu.us/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Dear-Representative-LaMalfa.docx. If you live in another district, please contact your Senators and Congresspeople (http://www.usa.gov/Contact/Elected.shtml), in any state you’re in, to remind them that a debt is still owed by the United States to the Winnemem Wintu people, and ask them to vote NO on any proposal to raise Shasta Dam. Learn more about why the Shast Dam raise must be stopped at www.shastadamraise.com.

Corrected Rep. LaMalfa contact link.  Thanks cpata.tumblr.com!

winnememwintuvoice:

winnememwintuvoice:

— WE ARE FIGHTING FOR OUR CULTURAL SURVIVAL —

We were flooded out, and not compensated, with the building of Shasta Dam in 1945, and now Westlands Water District and the Federal Government are pushing to do it again. This latest proposal would inundate or damage more than 40 sacred sites, including our Coming of Age ceremony place on the Winnemem Waywaqat (McCloud River).

Representative Jim Costa, of Fresno, has introduced a bill, co-signed by a number of California Democratic Congressmen, to raise the dam. No mention of the standing debt to our people.

Is your U.S. representative Doug LaMalfa? You can make a difference to support Winnemem Wintu cultural survival by telling him not to authorize the proposal to raise Shasta Dam by 18.5 feet.

You can call LaMalfa at (530) 223-5897 or email him by filling out this online form: https://lamalfa.house.gov/contact/email-me

Here is a sample letter you can use: http://www.winnememwintu.us/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Dear-Representative-LaMalfa.docx.

If you live in another district, please contact your Senators and Congresspeople (http://www.usa.gov/Contact/Elected.shtml), in any state you’re in, to remind them that a debt is still owed by the United States to the Winnemem Wintu people, and ask them to vote NO on any proposal to raise Shasta Dam.

Learn more about why the Shast Dam raise must be stopped at www.shastadamraise.com.

Corrected Rep. LaMalfa contact link.  Thanks cpata.tumblr.com!

(via occupiedmuslim)

Beautiful

lightspeedsound:

The first time 
I actually believed I was beautiful
Was when,
at age 20

A trans friend of mine 
Surveyed my Asian eyes 
Looking accusatorially at my reflection
Staring at my protruding tummy
Stretching and poking at my skin
As I wondered out loud whether
I could wear a midriff baring top
Because I didn’t have “that typical skinny Asian schoolgirl figure”

And she whispered to me
Her eyes meeting mine in the mirror
"I would kill to have a body like yours.”

And I looked up at her tall, strong body
And her lovely, wispy ginger curls 
And with a Jolt of electric epiphany
I realized that 
Society had told her 
(The exact opposite of me)
What Society had told me 
(The exact opposite of her)

That we were both
The very definition of 
"unattractive" 

But maybe 
Perhaps
Could it be?
We actually had the power
To define ourselves 
…as beautiful 

And my heart broke
For the both of us
Bleeding invisibly under our skins 
Living our whole lives 
Being told to ignore
The glorious pleasure of
Our own beauties 

Buddhism is not a fantasy, it does not exist for you to observe

stabra:

angryasiangirlsunited:

hate hate hate hate hate hate hate hate hate crappy articles like this that proclaim to offer some objective view of foreign countries by someone not native to those countries. 

I’m so fucking over this trend of shitting on China and Chinese people at every opportunity. Especially when it pits another East Asian country against China as being ‘better’. Just because a white person feels more comfortable in one place does not make it more valid or inherently better. 

I think I could have just let this go if not for #3 because I am a Buddhist practitioner and scholar and I just can’t…. 

3. Religion is an integral component of life in Taiwan.
Christianity has an obvious presence — my granddaughter goes to a Christian school. Buddhist temples in China are largely filled with tourists. It was the crowds of real worshipers in the temples of Taiwan that struck me. The temples I saw in mainland China were more like sterile artifacts. In Taiwan I could observe the religion in action and began to gain a greater understanding of it. It is a shame that such a rich part of the Asian culture has been wiped away in modern China.

Straight up this is some ignorant shit. Christianity’s more obvious presence in Taiwan is not something worth valuing or being proud of because Christianity was brought over to Taiwan by missionaries who are racist, colonialist assholes who thinks their religion is superior to everyone else’s.

But mostly, I just cannot even fathom wtf she’s talking about when she says that Buddhist temples in China are largely filled with tourists. Like how many temples did she go to? I went on a Buddhist pilgrimage through Southern China and I’ve been to most of the major temples in Beijing. All of the temples were filled with activity from monks and lay people alike. Maybe she thought the pilgrims were tourists???? A lot of Chinese people spend their precious few days of vacation visiting temples because their religion is important to them. Like, I’m sorry that your experience of China was ruined by the Chinese people and that you thought crowds of Chinese people anywhere were automatically tourists? Also, WTF is a ‘real worshiper’.

People practice Buddhism in a myriad of ways. It’s not up to foreigners or non-practitioners to judge what is and is not a valid practice or presentation of Buddhism. Some people go to temple to wish for money and fame - this is part of Buddhism. Some people go to temple to wish for world peace - this is part of Buddhism. Some people never go to temple at all - this is part of Buddhism. There are corrupt monks and there are righteous monks. There are monasteries that profit off of donations and there are monasteries in dire poverty. This is all Buddhism. Buddhism isn’t your orientalist fantasy of people giving up their possessions and meditating all day. Buddhism isn’t all about enlightenment or nirvana or inner peace. (I, for one, wish that everyone would just fucking forget about enlightenment for a second). Buddhism isn’t inherently nonviolent or peaceful and Buddhists aren’t inherently nice people. There are many different Buddhisms and they vary greatly. But all of it is Buddhism and we own up to even the shitty parts of it because that’s how we begin to create change within our own Buddhist community. So fuck that neo imperialist and orientalist gaze, passing judgement on something you know nothing about. 

I can’t even deal with the last fucking sentence. “It is a shame that such a rich part of the Asian culture has been wiped away in modern China”. You know what’s really a shame? That both British and Japanese imperialists colonized and invaded China repeatedly and stole a lot of precious cultural and religious artifacts while simultaneously killing millions of people and damaging Chinese culture. You know what else is a shame? That people don’t understand that religious practice in foreign countries is not something for you to observe and try to ‘understand’ as if your objective view of a religion is more valid than those who practice it everyday.

If the author stopped viewing the world as her personal servant that exists to make her feel comfortable and welcome, she might have had a slim chance at actually experiencing China.

A fellow AAG,

Melissa

yass. bolded favorite stuffs.

(via d2fang)

I really don’t think we’re going to end racism by joking about it. Like i’m glad that the white liberals feel like they are less racist because they can joke about people who are more explicitly racist but that actually does nothing to help people of color

thepeoplesrecord:

Dear Filipino organizers erased by the Cesar Chavez movement,
Coming to America in the 1920s was no vacation. Filipinos were “American nationals,” the result of recent colonization, and ironically exempted from the exclusionary Immigration Act of 1924 that precluded the influx of immigrants from “Asiatic Barred Zones.” Saved from the tyranny of Spain, young Filipinos like you were swallowed by an America famished for cheap labor. From Alaska and Hawaii to the West Coast, Filipino men became the bent backbones and the calloused hands of the sunburnt fields, paid a few dollars for long hours of work. And America was not in the heart, not yours, as it was the high tide of anti-miscegenation laws that made it criminal for Filipinos to marry white women. By 1965 when the United Farm Workers was founded, many of you had been in the fields for decades, organizing strikes and making your voices heard in the muted plains.
We immigrants mark our historical presence in America by the names of heroes who gave us a voice, an anodyne to invisibility in a country where documented history keeps some and discards others. It took me a long time to fully grasp Filipino-American history. Like you, I’m an immigrant who began my American voyage in silence. My political education had many twists and turns. In my 20s, I spent my Sundays teaching English to Chinese sweatshop workers in Brooklyn, my first exposure to the complex nexus of immigrant workers’ rights and organizing. I would learn that self-empowerment was moot unless spoken in the language of the oppressor. The workers’ inability to communicate exacerbated their plight. Word by word, my adult students learned the language of the negotiating table, slowly gaining power to address their oppressive working conditions. Workers’ Rights as a Second Language: strategically similar to the organizing methodologies employed by farmworkers like you in the ’40s and ’50s.
I didn’t know about you when I started organizing in the ’90s. I had role models, but no Filipino-Americans. In the community organizing world, no one ever mentioned Filipinos next to the apotheosized Cesar Chavez. No Larry Itliong. No Philip Vera Cruz. None of these Filipino men and their Agricultural Worker Organizing Committee that spearheaded the very strike that catapulted Cesar Chavez into American memory and left you in the shadows.
In the words of Philip Vera Cruz:

On September 8, 1965, at the Filipino Hall at 1457 Glenwood St. in Delano, the Filipino members of AWOC held a mass meeting to discuss and decide whether to strike or to accept the reduced wages proposed by the growers. The decision was “to strike” and it became one of the most significant and famous decisions ever made in the entire history of the farmworker struggles in California. It was like an incendiary bomb, exploding out the strike message to the workers in the vineyards, telling them to have sit-ins in the labor camps, and set up picket lines at every grower’s ranch… It was this strike that eventually made the UFW, the farmworkers movement, and Cesar Chavez famous worldwide.



Cesar Chavez has become a holiday, a stamp, a foundation, a national monument and a street and school in Delano. It is not surprising as the Latino community becomes a demographic force in the U.S. that 48 years later, a movie is being shown nationwide about the farmworkers movement, with Cesar Chavez at the romantic helm. Unfortunately, in the Hollywood version of historical dismissal, Filipino farmworkers are once again denied the proper recognition they deserve. In a recent appearance at UCLA, the director Diego Luna told a Chicano studies audience, “We have to send a message to the industry that our stories have to be represented. And with the depth and the complexity they deserve.”
Indeed, in the age of American ethnic diversity, it is all about representation, all about visibility — a spiritual mission to bring you, our fathers, back in the light. History might have worked in favor of Chavez in the past decades, but many Filipino Americans will do what it takes to put your names in the pages of American movements. A new documentary titled, Delano Manongs, interrogates the erasure of Filipinos from the farmworkers movement and presents the story from the point of view of the leader of the movement himself, Larry Itliong. In 2013, the New Haven Unified School District of Union City, CA renamed Alvarado Middle School Itliong-Vera Cruz Middle School. Even a new generation of Filipino Americans on the East coast, the Pilipino American Unity for Progress (Unipro), has made your invisibility part of their discourse.
Sí, se puede: the motto of the farmworkers movement, in Spanish — a language many of you didn’t speak, as if to say the movement was not spoken by your blood. But Cesar Chavez also said that “once social change begins, it cannot be reversed … you cannot oppress the people who are not afraid anymore.” Kaya Natin, we must say, We Can Do This. Kaya Natin: bring back your honor, bring back your light.
Kaya Natin,
Bino A. Realuyo
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Dear Filipino organizers erased by the Cesar Chavez movement,

Coming to America in the 1920s was no vacation. Filipinos were “American nationals,” the result of recent colonization, and ironically exempted from the exclusionary Immigration Act of 1924 that precluded the influx of immigrants from “Asiatic Barred Zones.” Saved from the tyranny of Spain, young Filipinos like you were swallowed by an America famished for cheap labor. From Alaska and Hawaii to the West Coast, Filipino men became the bent backbones and the calloused hands of the sunburnt fields, paid a few dollars for long hours of work. And America was not in the heart, not yours, as it was the high tide of anti-miscegenation laws that made it criminal for Filipinos to marry white women. By 1965 when the United Farm Workers was founded, many of you had been in the fields for decades, organizing strikes and making your voices heard in the muted plains.

We immigrants mark our historical presence in America by the names of heroes who gave us a voice, an anodyne to invisibility in a country where documented history keeps some and discards others. It took me a long time to fully grasp Filipino-American history. Like you, I’m an immigrant who began my American voyage in silence. My political education had many twists and turns. In my 20s, I spent my Sundays teaching English to Chinese sweatshop workers in Brooklyn, my first exposure to the complex nexus of immigrant workers’ rights and organizing. I would learn that self-empowerment was moot unless spoken in the language of the oppressor. The workers’ inability to communicate exacerbated their plight. Word by word, my adult students learned the language of the negotiating table, slowly gaining power to address their oppressive working conditions. Workers’ Rights as a Second Language: strategically similar to the organizing methodologies employed by farmworkers like you in the ’40s and ’50s.

I didn’t know about you when I started organizing in the ’90s. I had role models, but no Filipino-Americans. In the community organizing world, no one ever mentioned Filipinos next to the apotheosized Cesar Chavez. No Larry Itliong. No Philip Vera Cruz. None of these Filipino men and their Agricultural Worker Organizing Committee that spearheaded the very strike that catapulted Cesar Chavez into American memory and left you in the shadows.

In the words of Philip Vera Cruz:

On September 8, 1965, at the Filipino Hall at 1457 Glenwood St. in Delano, the Filipino members of AWOC held a mass meeting to discuss and decide whether to strike or to accept the reduced wages proposed by the growers. The decision was “to strike” and it became one of the most significant and famous decisions ever made in the entire history of the farmworker struggles in California. It was like an incendiary bomb, exploding out the strike message to the workers in the vineyards, telling them to have sit-ins in the labor camps, and set up picket lines at every grower’s ranch… It was this strike that eventually made the UFW, the farmworkers movement, and Cesar Chavez famous worldwide.

Cesar Chavez has become a holiday, a stamp, a foundation, a national monument and a street and school in Delano. It is not surprising as the Latino community becomes a demographic force in the U.S. that 48 years later, a movie is being shown nationwide about the farmworkers movement, with Cesar Chavez at the romantic helm. Unfortunately, in the Hollywood version of historical dismissal, Filipino farmworkers are once again denied the proper recognition they deserve. In a recent appearance at UCLA, the director Diego Luna told a Chicano studies audience, “We have to send a message to the industry that our stories have to be represented. And with the depth and the complexity they deserve.”

Indeed, in the age of American ethnic diversity, it is all about representation, all about visibility — a spiritual mission to bring you, our fathers, back in the light. History might have worked in favor of Chavez in the past decades, but many Filipino Americans will do what it takes to put your names in the pages of American movements. A new documentary titled, Delano Manongs, interrogates the erasure of Filipinos from the farmworkers movement and presents the story from the point of view of the leader of the movement himself, Larry Itliong. In 2013, the New Haven Unified School District of Union City, CA renamed Alvarado Middle School Itliong-Vera Cruz Middle School. Even a new generation of Filipino Americans on the East coast, the Pilipino American Unity for Progress (Unipro), has made your invisibility part of their discourse.

Sí, se puede: the motto of the farmworkers movement, in Spanish — a language many of you didn’t speak, as if to say the movement was not spoken by your blood. But Cesar Chavez also said that “once social change begins, it cannot be reversed … you cannot oppress the people who are not afraid anymore.” Kaya Natin, we must say, We Can Do This. Kaya Natin: bring back your honor, bring back your light.

Kaya Natin,

Bino A. Realuyo

Source

Black History Month: Canada Had Slavery?

fycanadianpolitics:

queennubian:

locsgirl:

evayna:

HOW DID I NOT KNOW ALL THIS!?!?!?!

'Cause history involving black people is always erased, that's why.

Because a lot of us were taught that once you got to north you were free, but if you could get the Canada you were safe from being dragged back into slavery by hunters. It was like Canada was best place you could be if you were trying escape slavery (per US history classes)

Author and historian Afua Cooper has described slavery in the Great White North as “Canada’s best kept secret.” She says that between 1628 and 1833, Canada had approximately 8,000 slaves, but it’s a part of the country’s history that is not well known.

“Canada conveniently forgot its own history of slave-holding, because that would make the country look immoral, indecent,” says Cooper […]

Before the British conquest of 1760 when Canada was still a French colony, nearly 60 percent of slaves were aboriginal and 40 percent were of African descent, Cooper estimates. After Britain took over, the ratio of aboriginal slaves declined as the British brought in more slaves from Africa, the West Indies, and the Caribbean, as well as from its 13 American colonies. 

Slave-owners in the American South were largely plantation owners, but in Canada they ran the gamut, from merchants and fur traders to farmers and even religious institutions.

“The slave owners were everybody, in every social class,” says Cooper. “Members of the clergy owned large amounts of slaves.”

(via randomactsofchaos)